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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
assad is expressing confidence he can ride on deadly chaos in his wore torn country. 13,000 people have been killed so far since the widespread fighting between assad ace g's government and riots began. thousands are being killed every week in that country. they are predicting 100,000 more could be killed. 3,000 are killed every day. what about assad and his future and the future of his nation. joining us a former ambassador of the united nations john volt. >> glad to be with you. >> there seems to be a stalemate. what in your view do you think will finally tip this? which way? >> i am not sure it's going to be tipped one way or the other any time soon. assad has been cleared for quite sometime he does not intend to relinquish power voluntarily. and he has reason to think that he can hang on as long as russia and iran continue to finance and supply him. they have been the bedrock of his offenses and the opposition while it made gains has not been able to shatter his regime has not been able to push him out. i think the prospect of this going on as it is thousands of silians being killed
, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states face
to be real -- the change house to be real. i think president assad has to respond to this aspiration of his people rather than resisting it. >> for more on that resistance, i spoke with the u.s. state department's formal -- former special advisor now out the atlantic council's career center for the middle east. thank you for coming in. believe me, they are trying to be diplomatic. it is time for assad to go, but is he making any push to go? >> i think is going to be very difficult for him to be -- to make progress in light of what president assad had to say a few days ago in the damascus opera house. i think that mr. beldini -- mr. bohimi at this point is placing an emphasis on getting support from americans and others. the transitional government of national unity, so to speak, that the united states and russia would try to then sell to the u.n. security council. >> is there any indication that moscow is prepared, or moving toward the decision of putting its eggs in assad's basket is not the thing to do? are you seeing any shift in russia's position? >> i do not detect a shift in the posit
community has been quick to condemn syrian president bashar al assad's plan for peace in war-torn countries. the first speech called "beyond hypocritical." addressing supporters, described the opposition as terrorists and slaves of foreign power. he went on to support the national dialogue to end the 21-no conflict. assad these talks could create a national charter on syria's future, which he put to a referendum. while the opposition dismissed the proposals saying they're aimed at wrecking current diplomatic efforts. we frort amman's neighboring jordan. in an opera house in central damascus, packed with cheering supporters, the syrian president gave his first speech since june last year. he did not reveal any breakthrough to end the conflict but said every syrian had an ethical duty to fight rebels he linked with al qaeda. >> they are terrorists who follow al qaeda's philosophy. they call themselves jihaddist. they come from across the world and are leading terror operations on the ground. after they fail to achieve anything, they have been relegated to the back lines and all they do is kid
is assad. you thought last year he would have fallen by now. most people did. it looks like a better prediction this year, but it seems as though it's even conceivable that he could wait out 2013 or no? >> no, i don't think so. i would say he hasn't fallen yet, but we're now into the end game where it's clear he's going to fall and just a question of how long, not just we're predicting, we want him out, but he really is on his way out. i don't think there is any way he will survive 2013, but i'm not convinced there will be a government to replace him by the end of 2013. >> why has he stayed there as long? i was more skeptical that he would fall quickly and the reason was simple. a very strong army and they have been incredibly brutal in their willingness to use it against the rebels. >> that's part of it. it's a real state. this is not like -- this is a real state but look what happened to the sunnis in iraq. they took their cue from that. they know it's not going to be pretty aftermath and they had external support. the russians and the chinese diplomatically and the iranians milita
prolonged period change house to be real -- the change house to be real. i think president assad has to respond to this aspiration of his people rather than resisting it. >> for more on that resistance, i spoke with the u.s. state department's formal -- former special advisor now out the atlantic council's career center for the middle east. thank you for coming in. believe me, they are trying to be diplomatic. it is time for assad to go, but is he making any push to go? >> i think is going to be very difficult for him to be -- to make progress in light of what president assad had to say a few days ago in the damascus opera house. i think that mr. beldini -- mr. bohimi at this point is placing an emphasis on getting support from americans and others. the transitional government of national unity, so to speak, that the united states and russia would try to then sell to the u.n. security council. >> is there any indication that moscow is prepared, or moving toward the decision of putting its eggs in assad's basket is not the thing to do? are you seeing any shift in russia's position? >>
and describe a national reconciliation conference and a new syrian constitution. guest: president assad has adopted a bellicose reaction to the rebellion. it is not an all-out civil war. throughout this conflict, he has adopted this tone that these people are terrorists and criminals. 60,000 syrians have been killed in the civil war. he is going to come middle ground to the rebels who think they are winning at this point. host: cure associated press is pointing out this is his first speech since last june theory his opponents are -- the associated press is pointing out that this is his first speech since last june. guest: the rebels are winning this conflict. the question is how long will it go on and how many syrians have to die before the assad regime toppled or some deal is reached to send him into exile. there is no deal that leaves him sharing any power. host: if he goes into exile, which country will take him? guest: russia has been his biggest backer. it comes immediately to mind as someone who would want to take someone responsible for the death of 60,000. host: during the conflict,
of damascus where rebels have pushed out troops loyal to president assad. to the north, around 00 men, -- 100 men, women, and children had paid smugglers to take them across be the border to turkey but were deported. this from one of the largest refugee camps. >> this is one of the largest refugee camps in turkey. a container city along the border with syria. the cubicles are equipped with running water, heaters and air conditioning. the 13,000 refugees living here don't have to worry about the cold or floods. but for most, it's still a long way from the comforts of home. >> we can't wait to go back home. but, look, we have been abandoned. we thought it was going to be a matter of three months. the world is against us much the arab world, the west, the arab league, they have all left us on our own. >> this man and his family may be luckier than those trapped inside syria or the thousands of refugees facing tougher conditions in jordan and lebanon, but any time they watch the news, they are distressed. >> the scenes of the refugees facing cold are heartbreaking. these are children. i cannot fi
assad in months. tonight we asked alex marquardt to read between the lines. is this a leader who thinks he can survive? >> reporter: president assad mobbed by supporters at his first address to the nation in over half a year. in front of the faces of soldiers who had died, he slammed the west and called for political dialogue to end almost two years of war. regional and western states should stop furnding, arming and sheltering rebels, he said, who should also stop all acts of terrorism. assad said the military would then stop fighting and peace talks could start. we will negotiate with the ones that are behind those puppets, he said. we want a dialogue with the master, not with the servants. the united nations says the civil war has left more than 60,000 syrians dead. in his only interview with american media during this conflict, assad told abc's barbara walters that his forces targeted terrorists, not civilian protesters. >> what is the misconception if there is any, about the protests? >> we don't kill our people. nobody kills -- no government in the world kills its people unless --
jazeera, live from doha. also, finding the reaction to president assad. warnings of more fires in australia. who will be named the world's best footballer? we will find later in the awards. the free syrian army says it will not accept the new peace plan. assad laid out some resolutions for ending the conflict in her first -- in the first speech since june of last year. he has been condemned at home and abroad. >> with an audience of cheering supporters, syria's president gave his first speech since june of last year. >> they are terrorists who follow all kind of philosophy. they call themselves jihadists. -- who follow al qaeda philosophy. >> it excludes those he says are betraying syria. >> there is a group of extremists who understand no language other than terrorism. >> this group watched the speech with scorn. >> we hope this is his last speech, and we think it is a waste of time. >> he is trying to be little the revolution. we think this is the people's revolution. >> they were forced to listen to the speech on the radio. the electricity was down again. >> we did not have
own people to give a rare public address. his first speech since june and is assad promised to keep fighting the rebels whom he described as terrorists and religious extremists and murderous criminals and activities say the speech did not do anything to stop the fighting. the united nations reports the syrian civil war has led to the deaths of more than 60,000 people since march of 2011. jonathan hunt is with us. u.s. officials very critical of bashir al-assad's speech. >> a broken record is exactly what he resembles right now. in his speech that the u.s. officials and others believe is meaningless dialogue and criticizing the rebels as criminals and terrorists. despite the fact that the u.n. now reports 60,000 syrians have died in the ongoing civil war are there' peers to be no change in -- there appears to be no change in u.s. policy. >> i don't want to get into a numbers game. it is a horrible brutal tragedy what is going on in syria but it is the assad regime that bears fundamental responsibility which speaks to the callous attitude he showed in th speech. he could silence his o
president biden. the magazine stands by its reporting. >>> now to syria where president assad addressed his nation in a rare speech just moments ago since the embattled president's last address in june, tens of thousands of syrians have been killed and even more have fled their homeland. more than 60,000 people have been killed across the country and the new year looks to be ushering in the same bloodshed and violence. mohammed jamjoon is watching things from beirut. if you can, break down what he had to say. >> good morning, randi. what we heard was a defiant reporting a lot of the same rhetoric that we heard from him when he's given speeches. rarely he has given them the last couple years but when he's given them or given interviews he disputed the notion that there was even a revolution going on in syria. he talked about how there was no fight in syria between the opposition and government forces, rather, it was between syria and its enemies. here's more of what he had to say specifically on that point. >> they are calling it a revolution. but it is not a revolution. revolutions need int
assad, and then a discussion on the future of u.s. energy policy. at 11:00 p.m., "q&a" with timothy naftali, former director of the nixon presidential library. >> studentcam video and trees are now do, friday, january 18, for your chance at the ground prize -- the grand prize. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> in a rare address to the nation, syrian president bashar al assad talked about moving forward but made no mention of stepping down. he proposed a new constitution, which he said would have new laws. he thanked russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend itself against outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed was in 2012. this comes to was courtesy of aljazeera english. -- comes to us. >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [crowd chanting] not so long after, it was said that maybe as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives in during the course of the 21- month conflict. while our translators are standing by to bring you -- pres
president assad to step down as a precondition for talks. very little is changing with the diplomatic efforts. the united states and europe press for ah assad to step down. russia backs assad as the violence continues in syria, uma. >> coming up on america's news headquarters. starting this spring our troops will have a different mission. >> president obama discusses that mission in the weekly address this one day after meeting with afghan president karzai. stay with us. stouffer's is proud to make america's favorite lasagna... with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes, and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. if we took the already great sentra apart and completely reimagined it? ...with best-in-class combined mpg... and more interior room than corolla and civic? ...and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation and other handy stuff? yeah, that would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169-per-mon
a new peace proposal from syrian president ba bash sar assad. calling for assad to step aside saying his claim is an attempt at staying in power. the u.n. estimates the up rising that began against assad's regime nearly two years ago claimed at least 60,000 4r50i6s. i am mary ann raf perrafferty. you are watching the most powerful name in news, fox news channel. huckabee. >> in 1986 this woman was walking to work in new york. she passed an 11-year-old boy named maurice who said he was hungry and he asked her for money to buy food. she kept walking but then stopped and walked back to morris and offered to take him to mcdonalds for a burger. his mom was on drug and his dad in a street gaining. she knew he needed more than just a meal that afternoon. for the next four years they met every monday for lunch and today, after 26 years, they consider each other family. their story is told in a remarkable new book called the invisible thread. one welcome laura and maurice. [applause] >> this is one of the most touching and inspiring stories that i have read in a long time. the book is fantastic.
's embattled president al assad made it clear that he has no plans to step down as the country's leader. he offered a peace plan but rolled out any talks with the armed opposition and said they will not negotiate until regional countries stop fighting. assad must step down. the state department called assad's initiative "detached" from reality in an attempt to cling to power. >>> venezuela's leader hugo chavez is still in cuba following a cancer operation last month. chavez is set to be inaugurated for a fourth presidential term on thursday. it may be postponed if not returned in time. his absense would create a constitutional crisis, possibly leading to an interim government and another election. >>> coming up next, why the bill to avert the first round of the fiscal cliff was stuck with billions, that's right, billions with a "b" of corporate tax gives aways from wall street to hollywood and nascar and you're watching "daily rundown" only on msnbc. first 20 came off, well it wasn't too hard at all." i love breads. you can still eat bread. i love my sweets. i can still have a cookie on wei
:00 on c-span's q&a. >> in a rare address to the nation, the syrian president bashar al-assad. he proposed a new constitution that he said would include new laws for the party's and local administration. he think russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend themselves from outside forces. the last time he addressed the nation was in june 2012. coverage comes to us courtesy of al-ajzeera english. -- al- jazeera english. >> this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. official figures in united nations said as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21 month conflict. [chanting] our translator is standing by [applause] -- by. [applause] president bashar al-assad, live from the syrian capital. >> ladies and gentlemen, today i look at your faces and the faces of the people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria. i'd look at the hands of the elderly today, pain and suffering is spread all over syria. safety and security are a
are in the middle of winter. no blankets. it is a very grim picture for people. >> bashar al assad still in power, not going to step down. russia the key player there. that is just one outside influence. we have the united states and the u.k. wanting him to step aside. you have things happening to the south and to the coast. what sort of environment are we looking at in terms of what assad might do next? >> it is extremely chaotic and unpredictable. because of the internationalization, much has been said this is part of war. with the money coming into it and the weapons, money from the gulf country to the rebels. it is a regional conflict. the fighting is taking place and has regional complications. >> chemical weapons. i believe his statement is he said earlier he is alluding to the chemical weapons and said it could involve u.s. troops saying you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved that they might ask for assistance in that situation. so defense secretary paneta discussing troops and the weapons. >> for u.s. and israel
nations. our translator is standing by to bring you president bashar al- assad, live. >> members of the government, ladies and gentlemen, today i would look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria and do not see an innocent smile on their faces. i look at the hands of the elderly and i see them praying for their children, daughters, and grandchildren. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans. siblings have been divided. this pain is spread over the country. from the pain, hope is born. from difficulty, solutions come. a dark cloud would hide the sun, but it would provide rain and cleanliness that would provide goodness for the country. syria will not come out of its impulse unless it changes this into a solution that will bring the country out of its impulse but it has never witnessed in the history of this region. this is the only way we can remedy all the injuries and deep wounds that we have in syria and the only way to keep syria
bashar al assad outlined new ways for the country to move forward, but he made no mention of stepping down as leader. he thanked russia and china for their support and stressed his country would do whatever it needed to defend itself against, quote, outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed the nation was in june of 2012. this 55-minute event is courtesy of al-jazeera english. [cheers and applause] >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [inaudible] officials from the united nations said there may be as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21-month conflict. [inaudible conversations] our translator's standing by to bring you -- [applause] the words of bashar bashar al assad live from the syrian capital. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: members of the government, heads and members of people's organizations, ladies and gentlemen, today i would look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children
of marriage act is heard the following day on march 27th. new violence in syria after president assad's declaration that he will not step down in a public address, he announced only he dictates the end of the civil war, a 21-month conflict costing more than 60,000 lives so far. those are your headlines. back to ashley. ashley: lawn -- lauren green, thank you so much. appreciate it. president obama facing heavy oppositions from republicans about the nomination of secretary of defense, and rich edson at the white house with more on this story. rich? >> well, one of the next of many fights in the u.s. senate, this one for senator chuck hagel, the president's pick to lead the pentagon, ashley, and looking at the case the white house makes is one that he's a decorated combat veteran, bun who is a bipartisan pick as a former republican senator from the state of nebraska, shows, the white house says, dependence in the pick, and advocate for war veterans, and the white house wants to make the point that he would be a solid steward of taxpayer money. >> as a successful businessman, he knows as
guys were our guys are gone, like mubarak. probably, probably assad is also a goner. such a nice plate -- place like tunisia has gone islamic. qatar, one of the greatest dependence of the united states is turning towards the extremists. hamas attack on israel is not out of the blue. it comes out of that strategic, change strategic map. so here we are being reminded once more, the careful what you wish for. we want a democracy. we seem to be getting islamization, and thus to the middle east movement that is not, say, friendly towards the west let alone towards israel. so what do we do until the good guys really become good guys, and to islamists become good liberal democrats? and didn't we at the very harsh harsh question i'm asking, didn't we do better with the mubarak's for the last 40 years? >> let me just responds very quickly which some of us -- summons us back to 2002001, 2002 to try to insert in our foreign aid to egypt, money for economic development in the for human rights, for other reforms that we felt were very necessary because obviously the nature of the mubarak government
will include leon panetta and tom donnellan. another story in the international press. assad is defiant, the leader of syria. he says he will stay put. another story in the news. hurricane sandy. a headline in the washington times. senator reid says -- the story is in nola.com. our question for you this morning is whether spending should be tied to a debt limit increase. should there be a refusal to increase the debt limit until spending as cut? lauren, baltimore, democrat. caller: here is my problem. if there was not spending, there would not be a debt limit. why should there be a question concerning the issue? in terms of governmental spending, i am not sure if very many are aware that government officials are making 2, 3, and four times as much as the average individual when they are using the numbers between 250,000 dollars and 400 thousand dollars. these government officials work six months out of the year. there are getting four-time -- full-time pay, which is four or five or six times more than the average individual. those are the same individuals who are caulking -- talking abo
. >>> the state department says a so-called peace plan put forward by syrian president bashar al assad is, quote, detached from reality. in his speech sunday he rejected in recall calls to step down and urged his supporters to defeat rebels who have been fighting for nearly two years to topple his regime. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is returning to her office today for the first time in a month. she was hospitalized last week for treatment of a blood clot in her head. this followed a stomach virus and concussion. >>> google chairman eric schmidt arrived in north korea today for a look at the communist country's economy and social media. the private trip has been criticized by the state department. schmidt is acom companied by bill richardson who will reportedly raise the plight of an american citizen jailed in north korea. let's lead to wall street kayla tausche is at the stock exchange. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. the first week of the new year was great for the stock markets. stocks reaching their highest point in more than five years. the market hasn't been this hi
, the syrian president bashar al-assad. he proposed a new constitution that he said would include new laws for the parties and local administration. he think russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend themselves from outside forces. the last time he addressed the nation was in june 2012. coverage comes to us courtesy of al-jazeera english. >> this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. official figures in united nations said as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21 month conflict. [chanting] our translator is standing by. [applause] [applause] president bashar al-assad, live from the syrian capital. >> ladies and gentlemen, today i look at your faces and the faces of the people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria. i'd look at the hands of the elderly today, pain and suffering is spread all over syria. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans.
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)